Edible Front Yard Garden

Around the world, people are growing “Edible Estates”.  The Edible Estates Initiative was founded in 2001 by Fritz Haeg. The project “is an ongoing series of projects to replace the American front lawn with edible garden landscapes responsive to culture, climate, context and people.”

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Edible front yard garden in Southern California.  Glad to see someone in California embrace the idea. The only thing I see missing here are fruit trees!  Photo from Edible Estate.

One of these days I’d like to have a front yard edible garden too.  I haven’t really come across a front yard garden around here, except for maybe a few artichoke or tomatoes along with rose bushes.  So I’ll probably have to do some research to see if there are any ordinance against growing food in the front yard.  Luckily we don’t live in an HOA.

As for my edible front yard garden, I do have to introduce the idea slowly since the neighbors might be in for a shock.  It seems everyone has nice green lawns here.   So far I’ve already started by growing calabaza squash and a strawberry plant.

I’ve always thought having a front lawn was such a waste of space and time.  All the mowing and watering.  And some people are very fond of Round-Up. The toxic weed killer. I could never use chemicals on my lawn.

On top of that people rarely spend time on their front lawn anyway.  It would make more sense to extend a front patio so people can come outside and enjoy the fresh air.  Wave at the neighbors or not. Then again, neighbors that hang out front all the time are just as annoying. Unless of course they put up privacy hedges or some type of enclosed patio.

And now that California is in a severe drought, it would just make sense for people to replace the lawn with more drought tolerant and native plants.  Even a succulent garden such as ice plants would be nice.  Maybe growing cactus around windows for extra security measure. The ideas are endless.

http://www.sacgardens.org

 

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Fuyu Persimmon Tree

This Fuyu persimmon tree was planted about a month ago.  If you look closely at the leaves, you’ll notice they appear to be drooping.  It wasn’t always this sad looking.

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Last week we had some pretty hot weather, three days of over 100 degrees.  To make up for the heat, we decided to give it lots of water.  So the next day we checked and the leaves were all droopy.  I am starting to think it was too much water, thus causing the roots to drown… hopefully not rotten.

So for now we have with held watering it.  And the leaves on the lowest/bottom tier appear to be gaining strength again.  So I am keeping my fingers crossed and hope the tree comes back to life.

Then again, I noticed the water was soaking in too fast.  And the tree trunk was moving as if the soil became loose.  This does not look good!

Another problem we have in our backyard is gophers.  With all the other trees we planted, we used chicken wire baskets to protect the roots.  Since this was the last tree we planted, we thought the gophers may have left by now.  Especially with all the cats stalking them.

But I’ll give it a few weeks and see if it will get healthy again.  If not, then we may try to move it to a new location.

Update: July 18, 2014. The top half of the branches were dying so I pruned them off. We have withheld watering the tree. There is still signs of life and the leaves have perked up again.