Germinating Moringa Seeds

I’ve always wanted to try growing my own Moringa plant after learning about it’s many health benefits.  Moringa seeds and leaves are full of protein and vitamins.

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Photo of Moringa flower from wikipedia.

Fresh moringa leaves are sold at Asian market and some farmer’s market out in Northern California.  And moringa leaf powder is a popular supplement that can mixed into drinks.

Moringa are widely grown even in South America and Asia.  It’s being grown in Africa to combat malnutrition. Here in the U.S., they do very well in Hawaii, Florida and Texas.

I’ve seen Youtube videos of people growing Moringa successfully in southern California so I figured it’s worth a try.  It is a bit colder up north, so I just don’t know if it will survive our cooler winter.  But it’s worth experimenting.

Here are the steps to growing your own Moringa plant.  I got my seeds from Ebay, and I say the sprout rate is about 80%, which is not bad at all.

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Soak overnight.

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Place seeds on wet napkin.  Enclosed in glass container with lid on the windowsill.

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In about 5-7 days they start to emerge.  Then plant in good potting soil.  I’ll try to do an update once I plant them.

Mexicola Avocado Flower Buds

Our Mexicola Avocado tree survived it’s first Northern California winter.  Fortunately we didn’t have much of a freeze this past winter.  And it was also a very dry winter.  Out here the rainy season is in the winter followed by spring showers.

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Spring is around the corner and we had one day of good rain.  It looks like the Mexicola avocado flower is happy and celebrating.  Just today I actually saw one flower open up.

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This one looks like it’s doing a rain dance.

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There’s also some new young leaves coming out.  I have no idea if these will actually fruit this year.  Being that it’s a young tree, it’s always better for the tree to concentrate on growing strong roots instead.

Jim Bacon Avocado Tree Budding

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The Jim Bacon avocado tree started to burst out with lots of buds in mid-February.  I hope new leaves start to form as well.  Despite all the new flower buds, it is common them to start dropping in it’s first year of bloom.

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These avocado trees were planted last spring.  I think they were 2 year old trees grafted on a rootstock.  Grafted trees should fruit in 3-5 years versus seedling that may take 7-10 years.

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I didn’t really put much effort to protecting the tree last winter so I lost a few leaves due to frost damage.  I’ve already removed the damage leaves, so now the tree looks a bit thinner compare to last year.

But I will be prepare for the harsh summer heat by painting the trunks with 50/50 mix of water and white latex paint.  The white paint will protect it from sunburns.